The Mlangarini Project was founded in 2011 by high school student Olivia Leventhal. For five weeks she lived in the small village of Mlangarini, in Tanzania, building a classroom with fellow students. After returning home to Los Angeles, Olivia decided she wanted to do more for the village of Mlangarini. Her idea has now become a reality, and today she continues to benefit the lives of the people of Mlangarini.






Board of Directors:
CEO: Olivia Leventhal

Secretary: Kenneth Hurbert

Chief Financial Officer: Cindy Kolodziejski
Directors: David Turner & Janice Pretzlav

About Mlangarini Village

About the Mlangarini Project

About the Founder

This corporation is a nonprofit Public Benefit Corporation and is not organized for the private gain of any person. It is organized under the nonprofit public benefit corporation law for public and charitable purposes. The Mlangarini Project is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.


The Specific purpose of this corporation is to provide direct assistance to the local primary school of Mlangarini Village in Tanzania. 

 No part of the net earnings of the corporation shall inure to the benefit of, or be distributable to its trustees, directors, officers, or other private persons. 

Mlangarini Village is located in Arusha, Tanzania, where they speak Swahili and learn English as their second language. To attend school, all students must shave their heads for sanitary and health reasons, purchase a uniform, and pay a small fee. Unfortunately, not all families can afford this and their children suffer because of it. Most families in Mlangarini farm to sustain themselves, but sufficient amounts of food is an issue for many villagers. Yet this does not stop the people of Mlangarini from showing generosity and kindness. The way of life in this village is very communal; adults take care of each other's children, will feed someone if they are hungry, and open their homes with a welcoming smile. In America when someone knocks we say, "Who's there?" In Mlangarini they say, "You are welcome!" Most people of Mlangarini do not have electricity, adequate textbooks, or things as simple as Band-Aids. Even though they lack things that most of us take for granted, they are more generous than most Americans. This village is a special place and warms the hearts of all who visit.